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  • This dataset is the primary data output from the Corangamite land resource assessment project undertaken in 2002-2003. It contains soil and land information at a scale of 1:100 000 for all land in the region. The study also includes land degradation assessments for each unit. At the map scale of this dataset soil-landform units are not homogeneous. For each defined soil-landform unit, the number and proportion of landforms and soil types will vary. A group or groups of soils have been associated with each unit. representative sites and their associated profile properties are recorded in the study report. Importantly it should be noted that soil attributes (for example texture, sodicity, pH) are expected to vary between acquired soil sites. As the variability of soil attributes within a map unit is difficult to predict, it is important to note that representative soils should be used as a guide only. The study report describing the project methodology and dataset attributes, including representative soil profile data, is available from the Victorian Resources Online website (http://vro.depi.vic.gov.au/dpi/vro/coranregn.nsf/pages/soil_landform_map). DOI 10.4226/92/58e7149507e74

  • This dataset provides a hierarchical framework of geomorphological spatial entities at three tiers (Tier 1 represents the coarsest scale, Tier 3 representing the finest scale). Over the last decade in Victoria, geomorphology has been used to create a hierarchical classification of landforms and landscapes, known as the Victorian Geomorphology Framework (VGF). The VGF is a spatial framework consisting of a hierarchical system of land unit descriptions. The framework hierarchy is a spatial system to assist planning, monitoring and reporting for natural resource management in Victoria and Australia. The VGF describes and defines details of Victorias landscapes and provides a hierarchy to align past and future soil and land information. The upper level (Tier 1) has 8 Divisions and approximates to a scale of 1:1 000 000 to 5 000 000. Tier 2 has 34 categories, approximating to a scale of 1:500 000 to 2 000 000 while Tier 3 has 95 categories approximating to a scale of 1:100 000 to 500 000. Many of the boundaries are derived from the aggregation of soil-landform units/land systems, forming a hierarchical land type, particularly in relation to landform. The GMU250 layer includes soil erosion susceptibility assessments sourced from soil information contained in underlying regional studies which have been developed at regional scales of 1:100 000 or finer. The regional Land Resource Assessment (LRA) mapping at 1:100 000 scale effectively equates to the fourth tier of GMU mapping detail. As these units have been scaled up for use at the third tier, i.e. GMU250, it has meant a degree of generalisation across the LRA units. In these cases the dominant soil type, based upon maximum spatial extent, has been used for the susceptibility assessments. More information on the geomorpohology of Victoria can be found on Victorian Resources Online (http://vro.depi.vic.gov.au/dpi/vro/vrosite.nsf/pages/landform_geomorphology#mapping). DOI 10.4226/92/58e6f2752cfd6

  • A spatial dataset of soil and landform classification in Gippsland. The map units are broad `packages' of land - divided primarily on the basis of soil type, landform pattern and geology. It contains soil and land information at a scale of 1:100 000 for all land in the region. The dataset has been derived from a combination of past studies and has been collated primarily by Ian Sargeant and Mark Imhof from 1994 to 2013. Data from older surveys have also been included in this consolidated dataset. Mapping in east and northern Gippsland regions is restricted to freehold lands. Webpages on Victorian Resources Online provide a description of each of the map units and indicate source studies used to define the map unit. In June 2013 a dominant soil type was assigned to each unit (by David Rees, Mark Imhof and Ian Sargeant) to facilitate the creation of a digital soil map of Victoria. Australian Soil Classification (Order and SubOrder) have been included in the dataset's attribute table. At the map scale of this dataset soil-landform units are not homogeneous. For each defined soil-landform unit, the number and proportion of landforms and soil types will vary. Representative sites and their associated profile properties are recorded on the Victorian Resources Online website (http://vro.depi.vic.gov.au/dpi/vro/wgregn.nsf/pages/wg_soil_detailed). Importantly it should be noted that soil attributes (for example texture, sodicity, pH) are expected to vary between acquired soil sites. As the variability of soil attributes within a map unit is difficult to predict, it is important to note that representative soils should be used as a guide only. DOI 10.4226/92/58e719aeb6e7c

  • This dataset is the primary data output from the north-east land resource assessment project undertaken in 2001-02. It contains soil and land information at a scale of 1:100 000 for all freehold land in north-east Victoria. It also includes generic soil erosion risk assessments and agricultural capability. At the map scale of this dataset soil-landform units are not homogeneous. For each defined soil-landform unit, dominant soil types were identified prior to assessing their capability to support various enterprises. Often a co-dominant and minor soil type have been described as part of this process. Importantly it should be noted that soil attributes (for example texture, sodicity, pH) are expected to vary between acquired soil sites. As the variability of soil attributes within a map unit is difficult to predict, it is important to note that representative soils should be used as a guide only. The study report describing the project methodology and dataset attributes is available from the Victorian Resources Online website (http://vro.depi.vic.gov.au/dpi/vro/neregn.nsf/pages/ne_soil_landform_survey) DOI 10.4226/92/58e71be578ac0

  • This dataset is the primary data output from the Wimmera land resource assessment project undertaken in 2004-06. It contains soil and land information at a scale of 1:100 000 for all freehold land in the Wimmera region of Victoria. The dataset was developed by the project "A Land Resource Assessment of the Wimmera Region" conducted by Robinson et al. (2006). This project was undertaken by DPI's PIRVic Division for the Wimmera Catchment Management Authority to provide consistent land resource information across the region. It utilised data from existing soil surveys at varying scales and intensity conducted over the previous 60 years, remote sensing information and additional field work to develop updated 1:100 000 scale soil/landform mapping across the region. The nominal scale of the dataset is appropriate for broadscale assessment of land capability and regional planning. At the map scale of this dataset soil-landform units are not homogeneous. For each defined soil-landform unit, soil types were identified and an assessment of their risk of degradation (compaction, erosion, sodicity and acidity) was made. Importantly it should be noted that soil attributes (for example texture, sodicity, pH) are expected to vary between acquired soil sites. As the variability of soil attributes within a map unit is difficult to predict, it is important to note that representative soils should be used as a guide only. The study report describing the project methodology and dataset attributes is available from the Victorian Resources Online website. DOI 10.4226/92/58e729e8aea3e

  • This dataset is the primary data output from the Glenelg Hopkins land resource assessment project undertaken in 1999-2001. It contains soil and land information at a scale of 1:100 000 for all land in the south western corner of Victoria. The study also includes generic soil erosion risk assessments and agricultural capability, although these are mapped in separate datasets. At the map scale of this dataset soil-landform units are not homogeneous. For each defined soil-landform unit, the number and proportion of landforms and soil types will vary. A dominant soil type has been identified within each unit and soil property attributes provided by 'representative' sites. Importantly it should be noted that soil attributes (for example texture, sodicity, pH) are expected to vary between acquired soil sites. As the variability of soil attributes within a map unit is difficult to predict, it is important to note that representative soils should be used as a guide only. The study report describing the project methodology and dataset attributes is available from the Victorian Resources Online website (http://vro.depi.vic.gov.au/dpi/vro/glenregn.nsf/pages/glenelg_soil_map). DOI 10.4226/92/58e717be5073e

  • This dataset is the primary data output from the Goulburn Broken Dryland Regional Development Project conducted from 1998 to 2000. It contains soil and land information at a scale of 1:100 000 for all land in the region. At the map scale of this dataset soil-landform units are not homogeneous. For each defined soil-landform unit, the number and proportion of landforms and soil types will vary. A group or groups of soils have been associated with each unit. Representative sites and their associated profile properties are recorded in the study report. Importantly it should be noted that soil attributes (for example texture, sodicity, pH) are expected to vary between acquired soil sites. As the variability of soil attributes within a map unit is difficult to predict, it is important to note that representative soils should be used as a guide only.

  • This dataset comprises soil property mapping across the whole State of Victoria at 6 prescribed depths. The set depths are 0 to 5 cm, 5 to 15 cm, 15 to 30 cm, 30 to 60 cm, 60 to 100 cm and 100 to 200 cm. The mapped soil properties are pH (1:5 water), EC (dS/m), % clay and soil organic carbon (SOC %). The dataset has been created by the Understanding Soil and Farming Systems project (CMI 102922)and is referred to as Version 1.0 of the Victorian Digital Soil Map (VIC DSM 1.0). Soil point data stored in the Victorian Soil Information System (VSIS) from over 6,000 sites has been standardised to the set depths (using equal area splines or a value weighting derived from the proportional contruibution of each sample to the depth class). This processed data was used to attribute soil land units from a collection of surveys (mapped at 1:100k or better) collated to provide the best map unit coverage across the State. Only data from sites that match the soil type of the dominant soil within the land unit being attributed were used. Sites and land units were assigned an Australian Soil Classification (to the Suborder level) to aid this process. The raw profile data stored in the VSIS (as of March 2013) used to produce these maps were: pH data were either laboratory based (1:5 soil/water suspension) or field pH (Raupach and Tucker 1959). Clay % was laboratory derived particle size data (PSA all methods), or converted field observations of texture class (McKenzie et al. 2000). Organic Carbon measurements methods was either Walkley and Black or Heanes wet oxidation. Electical Conductivity was 1:5 soil/water extract (dS/m). The data is available in polygonal format (i.e. the land units) with soil property median value, standard deviation and assignment qualifier attributes. ESRI grids in ascii format at 100 m cell resolution have been generated from the attributed land unit polygon dataset for each soil property at each depth interval. The assignment qualifiers have been created in order to provide a level of quality evaluation for the soil property assignment to each polygon. Reliability maps generated from these qualifiers have been produced together with each soil property map. The strength of these products is our ability to leverage on the significant investment in soil site and survey mapping data procurement and the capture of tacit knowledge of former soil surveyors. A revised version of these digital soil maps is due to be released at the end of 2014.

  • A spatial map layer of soil type (Australian Soil Classification) for Victoria. The harmonised map consists of 3,300 land units (totaling about 225,000 polygons) derived from around 100 soil and land surveys carried out in Victoria over the past 70 years. The land units have been attributed according to the Australian Soil Classification (Order and Suborder levels of the classification scheme) based on their likely dominant soil type. Particular attention was given to harmonising land units across survey boundaries. A reliability index has been assigned to each land unit based on the quality and relevance of the originating survey, providing a qualitative reliability measure to support interpretation and data use. Soil site data contained in the Victorian Soil Information System (VSIS), and information on the Victorian Resources Online (VRO) website and original study reports have been combined with landscape knowledge to develop the new maps. Data from approximately 10,000 existing sites recorded, mostly recorded in the VSIS have been used. The soil type is based on land mapping conducted at different times, at variable scale, and for different purposes. Land units are therefore of variable scale and quality in relation to the soil they are representing. Many units will be comprised of multiple soil types and a range of soil properties, and local variability (e.g. at paddock scale level) can also sometimes be high. The mapping, therefore, is intended to represent the dominant, or most prevalent, broad soil type within the map unit. It is therefore adequate for regional or state-wide overviews but may not often be accurate enough for localised or within-farm assessments. For more detailed soil and land information, users are advised to refer to the original land study for any given map unit (e.g. via Victorian Resources Online website).