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  • This layer contains points showing the location of groundwater bores in the Water Measurement Information System (WMIS) that have recorded co-ordinates. WMIS is the primary access point to search, discover, access and download surface water and groundwater monitoring data collected by DEPI and its partners. WMIS contains data from a range of sources, primarily from the registration of bores requiring a bore construction licence (Water Act, 1989), as well as groundwater level and groundwater chemisty data. For more detailed information on individual bores, the user is referred to the WMIS site at http://data.water.vic.gov.au/monitoring.htm.

  • Projection data is described in the gridcode column of the attribute table. This number is 1000 times the actual value (retained in this form to capture significant figures through map processing). For example, "Gridcode -23599" equates to -24% (rainfall) and "Gridcode 1986" equates to 2.0 degrees Celsius (temperature). The results are from 23 climate models that were available for the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (2007). It is assumed that that the model results give a representation of the real world response to a specific emissions scenario. The IPCC (2007) estimates of global warming are relative to the period 1980-1999. For convenience, the baseline is often called 1990. Projections are given for 2030 and 2070 but, of course, individual years can vary markedly within any climate period, so the values can be taken as representative of the decade around the single year stated, i.e. projections for 2030 are representative of 2026-2035. Natural variability (independent of greenhouse gas forcing) can cause decadal means to vary and estimates of this effect are included in the estimates of uncertainties. The projections comprise a central estimate and a range of uncertainty. The central estimate is the median – or 50th percentile - of the model results, while the uncertainty range is based on two extreme values – the 10th and 90th percentiles. 10% of values fall below the 10th percentile and 10% of values lie above the 90th percentile. Greater emphasis is given to projections from models that best simulate the present climate. The weightings are based on statistical measures of how well each model can simulate the 1975-2004 average patterns of rainfall, temperature, and sea level pressure over Australia. Subregions of Victoria are indicated. Victoria has an integrated catchment management system established under the Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994 (the CaLP Act). Under the CaLP Act, Victoria is divided into ten catchment regions, with a Catchment Management Authority (CMA) established for each region. (See: http://www.water.vic.gov.au/governance/catchment_management_authorities)

  • This raster is part of Vicmap Lite and depicts the terrain using hillshading. This Vicmap Lite dataset is suited for use between scales of 1: 2 million and 1 : 5 million. The source DEM was sourced from Vicmap Elevation. The resolution of the raster is 800m which suits the 1: 2 million - 1 : 5 million scale range. MGA 54 THIS DATASET WAS LAST UPDATED IN AUGUST 2008

  • Projection data is described in the gridcode column of the attribute table. This number is 1000 times the actual value (retained in this form to capture significant figures through map processing). For example, "Gridcode -23599" equates to -24% (rainfall) and "Gridcode 1986" equates to 2.0 degrees Celsius (temperature). The results are from 23 climate models that were available for the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (2007). It is assumed that that the model results give a representation of the real world response to a specific emissions scenario. The IPCC (2007) estimates of global warming are relative to the period 1980-1999. For convenience, the baseline is often called 1990. Projections are given for 2030 and 2070 but, of course, individual years can vary markedly within any climate period, so the values can be taken as representative of the decade around the single year stated, i.e. projections for 2030 are representative of 2026-2035. Natural variability (independent of greenhouse gas forcing) can cause decadal means to vary and estimates of this effect are included in the estimates of uncertainties. The projections comprise a central estimate and a range of uncertainty. The central estimate is the median – or 50th percentile - of the model results, while the uncertainty range is based on two extreme values – the 10th and 90th percentiles. 10% of values fall below the 10th percentile and 10% of values lie above the 90th percentile. Greater emphasis is given to projections from models that best simulate the present climate. The weightings are based on statistical measures of how well each model can simulate the 1975-2004 average patterns of rainfall, temperature, and sea level pressure over Australia. Subregions of Victoria are indicated. Victoria has an integrated catchment management system established under the Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994 (the CaLP Act). Under the CaLP Act, Victoria is divided into ten catchment regions, with a Catchment Management Authority (CMA) established for each region. (See: http://www.water.vic.gov.au/governance/catchment_management_authorities)

  • The Port Phillip Bay Coastal Hazard Assessment (the product) is a digital dataset consisting of multiple spatial layer outputs from modelled erosion, inundation and groundwater hazard scenarios. The product is recommended for use at the regional scale around Port Phillip Bay. Application of the data should be guided by the accompanying Port Phillip Bay hazard assessment technical reports (CSIRO 2022, Water Technology 2023, Kennedy 2022) and expert advice. The product is not suitable for individual property scale assessments. The datasets available are as follows. Further detail on technical assumptions for these scenarios are provided in the accompanying technical reports. Additional data sets referenced in the reports are also available on request. Storm tide inundation Storm tide inundation extents for the 1% Annual Exceedance Probability (AEP) for a range of Sea Level Rise (SLR) scenarios (0m, 0.5m, 0.8m, 1.1m): - PPBCHA_INUNDATION_EXTENT_1AEP_00SLR - PPBCHA_INUNDATION_EXTENT_1AEP_05SLR - PPBCHA_INUNDATION_EXTENT_1AEP_08SLR - PPBCHA_INUNDATION_EXTENT_1AEP_11SLR - PPBCHA_INUNDATION_EXTENT_1AEP_14SLR - PPBCHA_INUNDATION_EXTENT_1AEP_00SLR_WITHRAINFALL - PPBCHA_INUNDATION_EXTENT_1AEP_05SLR_WITHRAINFALL - PPBCHA_INUNDATION_EXTENT_1AEP_08SLR_WITHRAINFALL - PPBCHA_INUNDATION_EXTENT_1AEP_11SLR_WITHRAINFALL - PPBCHA_INUNDATION_EXTENT_1AEP_14SLR_WITHRAINFALL Storm tide inundation extents for each SLR scenario are presented as a combined vector layer that incorporates the modelled 95th, 50th, and 5th percentiles. Erosion Erosion extents for the 1%AEP for a range of Sea Level Rise (SLR) scenarios (0m, 0.2m, 0.5m, 0.8m, 1.1m). - PPBCHA_EROSION_EXTENT_1AEP_2010_00SLR - PPBCHA_EROSION_EXTENT_1AEP_2040_02SLR - PPBCHA_EROSION_EXTENT_1AEP_2070_05SLR - PPBCHA_EROSION_EXTENT_1AEP_2100_08SLR - PPBCHA_EROSION_EXTENT_1AEP_2100_11SLR - PPBCHA_EROSION_EXTENT_1AEP_2100_14SLR Erosion hazard extents are the modelled 95th percentile. Sea level of 0m as of 2010. Groundwater Groundwater extents indicating where the hazard is shallow (within 0 to 2m below land surface) for a range of Sea Level Rise (SLR) scenarios (0m, 0.2m, 0.5m, 0.8m): - PPBCHA_GROUNDWATER_EXTENT_SHALLOW_00SLR - PPBCHA_GROUNDWATER_EXTENT_SHALLOW_02SLR - PPBCHA_GROUNDWATER_EXTENT_SHALLOW_05SLR - PPBCHA_GROUNDWATER_EXTENT_SHALLOW_08SLR - PPBCHA_GROUNDWATER_EXTENT_SHALLOW_11SLR - PPBCHA_GROUNDWATER_EXTENT_SHALLOW_14SLR Shallow groundwater extent layer is derived from the groundwater depth raster. Report Citations: CSIRO - McInnes, K.L., O’Grady, J.O., Prakash, M., Dahlhaus, P., Rosengren, N.J., Hoeke, R.K., Lauchlan Arrowsmith, C., Hernaman, V., Cohen, R., Seers, B., Chen, Y., Walters, D., Couto, P., Trenham, C., Forbes-Smith, N. Gregory, R., Hemer, M. and Power, R. (2022) Port Phillip Bay Coastal Hazard Assessment: Final Report. Report to Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning. 236 pages + 11 Appendices. Water Technology (2023) Erosion Hazard Summary Report, Port Phillip Bay Coastal Erosion Hazards, Report to Department of Energy, Environment and Climate Action Kennedy, D. M. (2022), Tertiary Coastal Compartments in Port Phillip Bay: Review, Definition and Methodology, Report to Department of Energy, Environment and Climate Action. School of Geography, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, The University of Melbourne.

  • Projection data is described in the gridcode column of the attribute table. This number is 1000 times the actual value (retained in this form to capture significant figures through map processing). For example, "Gridcode -23599" equates to -24% (rainfall) and "Gridcode 1986" equates to 2.0 degrees Celsius (temperature). The results are from 23 climate models that were available for the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (2007). It is assumed that that the model results give a representation of the real world response to a specific emissions scenario. The IPCC (2007) estimates of global warming are relative to the period 1980-1999. For convenience, the baseline is often called 1990. Projections are given for 2030 and 2070 but, of course, individual years can vary markedly within any climate period, so the values can be taken as representative of the decade around the single year stated, i.e. projections for 2030 are representative of 2026-2035. Natural variability (independent of greenhouse gas forcing) can cause decadal means to vary and estimates of this effect are included in the estimates of uncertainties. The projections comprise a central estimate and a range of uncertainty. The central estimate is the median – or 50th percentile - of the model results, while the uncertainty range is based on two extreme values – the 10th and 90th percentiles. 10% of values fall below the 10th percentile and 10% of values lie above the 90th percentile. Greater emphasis is given to projections from models that best simulate the present climate. The weightings are based on statistical measures of how well each model can simulate the 1975-2004 average patterns of rainfall, temperature, and sea level pressure over Australia. Subregions of Victoria are indicated. Victoria has an integrated catchment management system established under the Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994 (the CaLP Act). Under the CaLP Act, Victoria is divided into ten catchment regions, with a Catchment Management Authority (CMA) established for each region. (See: http://www.water.vic.gov.au/governance/catchment_management_authorities)

  • Projection data is described in the gridcode column of the attribute table. This number is 1000 times the actual value (retained in this form to capture significant figures through map processing). For example, "Gridcode -23599" equates to -24% (rainfall) and "Gridcode 1986" equates to 2.0 degrees Celsius (temperature). The results are from 23 climate models that were available for the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (2007). It is assumed that that the model results give a representation of the real world response to a specific emissions scenario. The IPCC (2007) estimates of global warming are relative to the period 1980-1999. For convenience, the baseline is often called 1990. Projections are given for 2030 and 2070 but, of course, individual years can vary markedly within any climate period, so the values can be taken as representative of the decade around the single year stated, i.e. projections for 2030 are representative of 2026-2035. Natural variability (independent of greenhouse gas forcing) can cause decadal means to vary and estimates of this effect are included in the estimates of uncertainties. The projections comprise a central estimate and a range of uncertainty. The central estimate is the median – or 50th percentile - of the model results, while the uncertainty range is based on two extreme values – the 10th and 90th percentiles. 10% of values fall below the 10th percentile and 10% of values lie above the 90th percentile. Greater emphasis is given to projections from models that best simulate the present climate. The weightings are based on statistical measures of how well each model can simulate the 1975-2004 average patterns of rainfall, temperature, and sea level pressure over Australia. Subregions of Victoria are indicated. Victoria has an integrated catchment management system established under the Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994 (the CaLP Act). Under the CaLP Act, Victoria is divided into ten catchment regions, with a Catchment Management Authority (CMA) established for each region. (See: http://www.water.vic.gov.au/governance/catchment_management_authorities)

  • Projection data is described in the gridcode column of the attribute table. This number is 1000 times the actual value (retained in this form to capture significant figures through map processing). For example, "Gridcode -23599" equates to -24% (rainfall) and "Gridcode 1986" equates to 2.0 degrees Celsius (temperature). The results are from 23 climate models that were available for the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (2007). It is assumed that that the model results give a representation of the real world response to a specific emissions scenario. The IPCC (2007) estimates of global warming are relative to the period 1980-1999. For convenience, the baseline is often called 1990. Projections are given for 2030 and 2070 but, of course, individual years can vary markedly within any climate period, so the values can be taken as representative of the decade around the single year stated, i.e. projections for 2030 are representative of 2026-2035. Natural variability (independent of greenhouse gas forcing) can cause decadal means to vary and estimates of this effect are included in the estimates of uncertainties. The projections comprise a central estimate and a range of uncertainty. The central estimate is the median – or 50th percentile - of the model results, while the uncertainty range is based on two extreme values – the 10th and 90th percentiles. 10% of values fall below the 10th percentile and 10% of values lie above the 90th percentile. Greater emphasis is given to projections from models that best simulate the present climate. The weightings are based on statistical measures of how well each model can simulate the 1975-2004 average patterns of rainfall, temperature, and sea level pressure over Australia. Subregions of Victoria are indicated. Victoria has an integrated catchment management system established under the Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994 (the CaLP Act). Under the CaLP Act, Victoria is divided into ten catchment regions, with a Catchment Management Authority (CMA) established for each region. (See: http://www.water.vic.gov.au/governance/catchment_management_authorities)

  • This data is now obsolete, current UDP data is available. Identifies all industrial land across the Melbourne and Geelong and the development status and size of each land parcel in hectares. This information maps all industrial zoned land and land of industrial nature, ie. includes land within Special use zones, Airport Business Park, Business 3 Zones and Comprehensive Development Zone in Whittlesea. Each land parcel is assessed as being either Unavaillable or Supply industrial land and colour coded by as a combination of this and the zoning.

  • Projection data is described in the gridcode column of the attribute table. This number is 1000 times the actual value (retained in this form to capture significant figures through map processing). For example, "Gridcode -23599" equates to -24% (rainfall) and "Gridcode 1986" equates to 2.0 degrees Celsius (temperature). The results are from 23 climate models that were available for the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (2007). It is assumed that that the model results give a representation of the real world response to a specific emissions scenario. The IPCC (2007) estimates of global warming are relative to the period 1980-1999. For convenience, the baseline is often called 1990. Projections are given for 2030 and 2070 but, of course, individual years can vary markedly within any climate period, so the values can be taken as representative of the decade around the single year stated, i.e. projections for 2030 are representative of 2026-2035. Natural variability (independent of greenhouse gas forcing) can cause decadal means to vary and estimates of this effect are included in the estimates of uncertainties. The projections comprise a central estimate and a range of uncertainty. The central estimate is the median – or 50th percentile - of the model results, while the uncertainty range is based on two extreme values – the 10th and 90th percentiles. 10% of values fall below the 10th percentile and 10% of values lie above the 90th percentile. Greater emphasis is given to projections from models that best simulate the present climate. The weightings are based on statistical measures of how well each model can simulate the 1975-2004 average patterns of rainfall, temperature, and sea level pressure over Australia. Subregions of Victoria are indicated. Victoria has an integrated catchment management system established under the Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994 (the CaLP Act). Under the CaLP Act, Victoria is divided into ten catchment regions, with a Catchment Management Authority (CMA) established for each region. (See: http://www.water.vic.gov.au/governance/catchment_management_authorities)